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  • This series of interactive webinars will explore requirements and methods for delivering essential training relating to the operations of private military and security companies (PMSCs). The need for training programs is enumerated in national and international industry standards, is required in many contracts with clients of the industry, and was identified as an outcome of the 35th Round Table on current issues of International Humanitarian Law: Private Military and Security Companies held at the San Rem Institute for International Humanitarian Law in September 2012. The time has arrived to make such training a reality.

    This online workshop aims to identify practical approaches for training that: promote compliance with international law by PMSCs, their personnel, and clients of the industry; effectively aid in managing risks that may lead to international humanitarian and human rights law violations; and are broadly applicable within the context of armed conflict and beyond to complex emergencies and other comparable situations. The outcome will include identifying appropriate roles for states, PMSCs, international organizations, NGOs, and qualified training institutions in developing and offering such training.

    Participants are expected to work collaboratively to generate ideas and propose practical solutions for developing quality training, conducting outreach to relevant stakeholders, and identifying methods for delivering and evaluating credible, measurable, and auditable training programs. The webinars are interactive, and participants are expected to actively contribute to the workshop dialogues, and preferably commit to engage throughout the entire series. The desired output of the workshop is a set of proposals and recommendations that can be passed on to institutions and organizations with experience in training development, delivery, and evaluation for execution.

    This program is a must for anyone involved in managing, regulating, or training PMSCs and for anyone involved in the promotion, protection, and respect of international humanitarian and human rights law by state and non-state actors. Corporate trainers and training developers; corporate counsels and compliance and social responsibility officers; public and private sector clients and potential users of private military or security services; policy makers and regulators from governments and international organizations; standards developers and auditors; experts active in promoting respect for international humanitarian law, human rights norms, and rule of law in recovering societies are all encouraged to attend and will have the opportunity to shape the responsible provision of private security and private military services.

  • Please follow the links below to register. You must register for each webinar separately.

    AGENDA

    INTRODUCTION TO THE WORKSHOP

    Friday, November 1, 10:00-11:00pm ET

    This webinar will set out the need for a common understanding of training as it relates to Private Security Providers. This will include training necessary in the decision to use PSCs, the selection of PSCs, the operations of the PSCs themselves, and the proper oversight of their activities. Participants will be introduced to an overarching scenario that will provide the context for the seminar series. Use of the scenario will enable concepts to be presented and developed within a framework reflective of historic and emerging complex environments.

    Welcome

    Dr. Rebecca DeWinter-Schmitt, Co-Director, Initiative for Human Rights in Business, American University Washington College of Law

    The purpose of the workshop: The need for training and current requirements

    Col. (ret.) Christopher Mayer, U.S. Defense Department Director of Armed Contingency Contractor Policy and Programs

    Jamie Williamson, Legal Advisor, International Committee of the Red Cross

    The workshop agenda, the role of participants, and the overarching scenario: The peace agreement between Alta and Bass Sierra

    Col. (ret.) Christopher Mayer, U.S. Defense Department Director of Armed Contingency Contractor Policy and Programs

    TO REGISTER: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/279582162

    WHO NEEDS TO BE TRAINED

    Friday, November 8, 10:00-12:00pm ET

    Moving from a discussion of the need for training, this webinar will take on the challenge of identifying who needs to be trained. This will go beyond the employees and management of private security providers. Participants will be asked to identify all stakeholders who should be educated or trained in the operations of PSCs and the possible effects of such operations.

    Panel moderator:

    Dr. Deborah Avant, Director of the Sie Center for International Security and Diplomacy, University of Denver

    Legal considerations

    Maj. Gen. (ret.) Charles Tucker, Executive Director, World Engagement Institute

    Service providers

    Richard Phillips, Director, Edinburgh International

    State actors

    Timothy French, Advisor Global Forces, International Committee of the Red Cross

    Non-state actors

    Trevor Hughes, Director of Risk Management and Global Security, International Relief and Development

    Commercial clients

    Peter McComish, Director Corporate Security, Barrick Gold

    Moderated discussion (Please review the overarching scenario and discussion guide available at: http://ihrib.org/online-workshop-training-private-military-security-companies/)

    Col. (ret.) Christopher Mayer, U.S. Defense Department Director of Armed Contingency Contractor Policy and Programs

    TO REGISTER: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/571436730

    Download, “Who Should be trained?”

    THE ELEMENTS OF TRAINING: WHAT NEEDS TO BE TAUGHT?

    Friday, November 15, 10:00-12:00pm ET

    Having identified who needs to be trained or educated in various aspects of PSC operations, this webinar will explore the specific subject areas that need to be addressed.  This is more than the technical skills that security providers must master. It includes the ways in which these skills can be used, the authorizations and limitations that those involved with PSCs must be aware of, and the second and third order effects of PSC activities on the long term goals of those who use or regulate these services. This will include a discussion of how the specific operational environment might affect the subject material and the target audience for each subject area.

    Feedback and reactions to previous webinar

    Dr. Rebecca DeWinter-Schmitt, Co-Director, Initiative for Human Rights in Business, American University Washington College of Law

    Panel moderator:

    J.J. Messner, Senior Associate, Fund for Peace

    Humanitarian Law and Rules on the Use of Force

    International standards and Rules on the Use of Force

    Phillip Drew, Adjunct Professor, Queen’s University Faculty of Law

    National standards

    Dr. Ian Ralby, Executive Director, I.R. Consilium

    Human rights

    Dr. Rebecca DeWinter-Schmitt, Co-Director, Initiative for Human Rights in Business, American University Washington College of Law

    Maritime standards

    James Rapp, Managing Partner, 3rg

    Moderated discussion (Please review the overarching scenario and discussion guide available at: http://ihrib.org/online-workshop-training-private-military-security-companies/)

    Col. (ret.) Christopher Mayer, U.S. Defense Department Director of Armed Contingency Contractor Policy and Programs

    “What Needs to be Taught” download here

    Second Session Handout download here

    TO REGISTER: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/725449082

     

    PROVIDERS AND METHODS OF DELIVERY

    Friday, November 22, 10:00-12:00pm ET

    Building on previous seminar work identifying who needs to be trained or educated and the subject areas that need to be taught, this seminar will discuss possible sources for this training and how it might be delivered. Presentations will describe considerations of in-house and third party training providers and the role of the State and International Organizations. Using the webinar scenario, participants are expected to add their own insights about effective methods of delivery and to identify what elements can be taught on-site or in the affected region and which are more appropriately taught prior to deployment into a complex environment.

    Feedback and reactions to previous webinar

    Dr. Rebecca DeWinter-Schmitt, Co-Director, Initiative for Human Rights in Business, American University Washington College of Law

    Panel moderator:

    Jonathan Somer, International Law and Policy Consultant

    Commercial providers

    Dr. Aaron Ralby, Founder and CEO, Linguisticator, LLC Academic training institutions

    Academic training institutions

    Col. Périllat-Piratoine, Deputy Director, Military Department and Gian Luca Beruto, Assistant to the Secretary General, Institute for International Humanitarian Law

    In-house trainings

    Sylvia White, General Counsel, Aegis

    The role of the state

    Col. (ret.) Christopher Mayer, U.S. Defense Department Director of Armed Contingency Contractor Policy and Programs

    Moderated discussion (Please review the overarching scenario and discussion guide available at: http://ihrib.org/online-workshop-training-private-military-security-companies/)

    Third Discussion document

    Transitional National Governments Guidelines for PMCs document

    TO REGISTER: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/724978922

     

    TRAINING QUALITY ASSURANCE

    Friday, November 29, 10:00-12:00pm ET

    There is a military saying that “The only things that get done are the things that get checked.” In the world of management, a similar adage states “What gets measured, gets managed.” This webinar will explore what tools are needed to do this checking and what persons and organizations might be available, competent, and trusted to perform these checks. Panelists will discuss auditor training and competency, surveillance and monitoring techniques, and the role of international organizations. Participants will be expected to apply their own experiences in self- and external monitoring and conformance assessment to the information presented within the context of the overarching scenario.

    Feedback and reactions to previous webinar

    Dr. Rebecca DeWinter-Schmitt, Co-Director, Initiative for Human Rights in Business, American University Washington College of Law

    Panel moderator:

    Sorcha MacLeod, Lecturer, University of Sheffield School of Law

    Training commercial auditors

    John Lechner, Director of Education, ASIS International

    The role of national accreditation bodies

    Randy Dougherty, Vice-President, ANAB

    Monitoring

    Tony Chattin, Managing Director, MSS Global Ltd.

    Maritime security training

    Andrew Nicholson, Director Government and Industry Affairs, Drum Cussac

    Moderated discussion (http://ihrib.org/online-workshop-training-private-military-security-companies/)

    Col. (ret.) Christopher Mayer, U.S. Defense Department Director of Armed Contingency Contractor Policy and Programs

    Download the PMSC Training Matrix here.

    TO REGISTER: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/485360794

     

    NEXT STEPS: IMPLEMENTATION

    Friday, December 6, 10:30-12:30pm ET (Please note the later start time.)

    This webinar summarizes the work to this point. Most importantly, it solicits input from all participants to identify the next steps necessary to implement the conclusions and recommendations of this series. The goal is to identify a commonly accepted, multi-faceted training approach that will promote the responsible provision of private security services, when such services are necessary and appropriate.

    Feedback and reactions to previous webinar

    Dr. Rebecca DeWinter-Schmitt, Co-Director, Initiative for Human Rights in Business, American University Washington College of Law

    Moderated discussion:

    Col. (ret.) Christopher Mayer, U.S. Defense Department Director of Armed Contingency Contractor Policy and Programs

    Closing remarks: PMSCs in emerging security challenges

    Dr. Jamie Shea, NATO Deputy Assistant Secretary General for Emerging Security Challenges

    TO REGISTER:

    TO REGISTER: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/612525306

     

  • SPEAKERS BIOS

     

    Dr. Deborah Avant is the Sié Chéou-Kang Chair for International Security and Diplomacy and Director of the Sié Chéou-Kang Center for International Security and Diplomacy at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies, University of Denver.  Under her leadership the Sié Chéou-Kang Center launched the Private Security Monitor (http://psm.du.edu/), an annotated guide to regulation, data and analyses of private military and security companies throughout the world, in 2012. Her research (funded by the Institute for Global Conflict and Cooperation, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and the Smith Richardson Foundation, among others) has focused on civil-military relations, military change, and the politics of controlling violence.  She is author/editor of Who Governs the Globe? with Martha Finnemore and Susan Sell (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010), The Market for Force: the Consequences of Privatizing Security (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005), and Political Institutions and Military Change: Lessons From Peripheral Wars (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1994) , along with articles in such journals as International Organization, International Studies Quarterly, Security Studies, Perspectives on Politics, and Foreign Policy.  Professor Avant serves on numerous governing and editorial boards and has testified before Congressional Committees and the Commission for Wartime Contracting.

    Gian Luca Beruto has a Master’s degree in International Political Science from the University of Turin and is currently Assistant to the Secretary-General of the International Institute of Humanitarian Law in Sanremo. In this position, he supports the Secretary-General and the President in identifying and developing potential partnerships, establishing contacts and maintaining communication with Governments, International Organizations, national authorities and stakeholders at multiple levels.

    He is in charge of institutional communications and the external relationships of the Institute and he provides assistance in the development of several specific training projects in the field of International Humanitarian Law and Refugee Law.

    In 2005 and 2006, he participated in a United Nations peacekeeping mission in the Democratic Republic of Congo (MONUC) as part of the UN Programme for Disarmament.

    Tony Chattin, Managing Director, MSS Global Ltd, served in the UK’s Royal Marines as an officer for over 20 years.  His experience ranges from the complexities of contributing to government security strategy; to the delivery of security in emergent markets across the maritime and land domains; to working with local governance and broader partners.  He has assessed competence, and then designed and delivered security in to some of the most challenging and complex environments of the world.  As a Founder and the Managing Director of MSS Global, he has substantial and unique experience as a highly specialist UKAS recognized Certification Body.  MSS Global are the only ‘niche’ UK based CB that specializes in assessing the land and maritime private security industry against international standards, and are the only CB undertaking the UKAS and UK HMG sponsored pilot accreditation assessments for land security (PSC 1) and maritime security (ISO PAS 28007).  His unique skillset has been recognized at national level both in the UK and the US; Tony is a member of the UK mirror committee for the ongoing development of ISO PAS 28007, and he sits as an invited member on the US ANAB Committee of Experts for PSC 1, and the UK mirror committee for the development of PSC 1 in to a full ISO.

    Dr. Rebecca DeWinter-Schmitt is Co-Director of the Initiative for Human Rights in Business at the Center for Human Rights & Humanitarian Law at American University’s Washington College of Law. She is an expert in business and human rights, in particular pertaining to the private military and security industry. She is a member of Amnesty International USA’s (AIUSA) Business and Human Rights Group and chairs the Working Group on Private Military and Security Companies. In various capacities, she has been involved in multi-stakeholder efforts to develop standards for private security providers. Through her inter-disciplinary research with a colleague at the Kogod School of Business, she is undertaking applied research to understand how the dynamic interaction between voluntary standards in the security industry shape the development of institutional design and to identify best practices in self-regulation.

    Until 2012, Dr. DeWinter Schmitt was an Assistant Professor at American University’s School of International Service’s Peace and Conflict Resolution Program, teaching courses on international affairs, human rights, ethics, economics of violence and peace, and corporate social responsibility. From 1998- 2002, Dr. DeWinter-Schmitt was a staff member of AIUSA, first in its National Field Program and then as Program Associate to the Just Earth! Program on Human Rights and the Environment.

    In 2007, Dr. DeWinter-Schmitt received her PhD from American University’s School of International Service for her dissertation, “Business as Usual? The Mobilization of the Anti-sweatshop Movement and the Social Construction of Corporate Identity.” Dr. DeWinter-Schmitt received her master’s degree from the University of Marburg, Germany and her undergraduate degree from Dickinson College, Carlisle, PA.

    Randy A. Dougherty is the Chair of IAF, co-convener of ISO/CASCO WG 21 that developed ISO/IEC 17021, and is employed as Vice President, ANAB for the ANSI-ASQ National Accreditation Board.  ANAB is the recognized national accreditation body for management systems certification bodies (CBs) in the in the US.  ANAB is a member of the International Accreditation Forum and a signatory of the IAF MLA.  ANAB is a member of the Inter American Accreditation Cooperation (IAAC) and a signatory of the IAAC MLA.

    Dougherty has more than 35 years of experience in third-party conformity assessment. He was employed by NSF International, an ANSI-accredited standards development organization and third-party product certifier, from 1975 to 1996, in numerous capacities the last being as Vice President.

    Phillip Drew is a Canadian Barrister and Solicitor who has recently retired after 30 years of military service. Prior to his retirement from the military in May 2013, he was Chief Standards Officer at the Canadian Forces Military Law Centre, where he was responsible for the design and development of legal education and training programs and materials for the Canadian Armed Forces.  Having completed operational tours as an intelligence officer in the Middle East, South West Asia, and Rwanda, and as a legal advisor at sea in the Indian Ocean region, he has a wide range of experience across the conflict spectrum.  Recognized internationally as a specialist on Rules of Engagement and training in the use of force, he regularly teaches the subject at several international staff colleges and has instructed at peace support training centres around the globe.  He is a co-author of the San Remo Handbook on Rules of Engagement and is on the faculty of the International Institute for Humanitarian Law.  He is also an Adjunct Professor at the Faculty of Law at Queen’s University where he teaches International Humanitarian Law and International Law.  He is currently a PhD Candidate at the University of Frankfurt (Oder) where he is being supervised by Professor Wolff Heintschel von Heinegg.

    Timothy French, a U.S. citizen, serves as an advisor with the Unit for Relations with Armed and Security Forces with the International Committee of the Red Cross in Geneva, Switzerland. In this capacity, he is responsible for coordination with and substantive expertise related to ICRC activities and dialogue with United States armed forces, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, private security companies and United Nations peacekeeping operations.

    Prior to his posting in Geneva, Tim was assigned as the Deputy Legal Advisor at the Washington Regional Delegation to the United States and Canada, where he was responsible for legal support to ICRC activities in the U.S. and Canada, with particular focus on detention matters, US domestic laws, and military doctrine. Before his tenure with the ICRC, Tim spent 12 years as an officer in the U.S. Navy, six of those as a Navy judge advocate.  His military experiences included service as a surface warfare officer, trial defense counsel, staff judge advocate positions abroad, and detainee operations in Iraq.

    Tim earned his J.D. at Georgetown University Law Center in Washington, D.C.  He also holds a B.S. in Mathematics from the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland.

    Trevor Hughes is the Director of Risk Management and Global Security for International Relief and Development (IRD).  He has worked as a global security strategist and has 18 years of experience in security and risk management.  Mr. Hughes served for 10 years in the U.S. Departments of Defense and State and has worked in international and corporate security across 45 countries.

    Mr. Hughes went to IRD from International Medical Corps in Washington, DC, where he was Director of Global Security. He has extensive experience in global security operations, crisis management, emergency response, and organizational preparedness and has been active in furthering the cause of aid worker safety and security.

    In addition to his role on the board of directors of International NGO Safety and Security Association, he was a founding member of the European Inter-agency Security Forum (EISF), is an active member of the Security Advisory Group (SAG), is a Tier 1 Security Leader™ in the Security Executive Council, a founding member of the Overseas Security Advisory Council (OSAC) International Development Working Group (IDWG) and was named Security Magazine’s 2011 “Most Influential People in Security”.

    John Lechner is Director of Education Programs at ASIS International. ASIS International’s mission includes the development of standards of effective security practices, and building education courses and materials to assist security practitioners to apply the standards.  Mr. Lechner through the ASIS Education Programs Department and with the assistance of the ASIS Foundation and Phoenix University, are investigating the future knowledge, ability, and skill gaps in the security workforce. The gap analysis along with the continuing ASIS job analysis studies provide a strong evidence for building curriculum.  Mr. Lechner is the key developer of ASIS certificate programs in the security field.  The certificate-based curriculum allows ASIS to provide guidance on education to academic institutes as well as private sector education.  Once complete, ASIS will be able to lend its name to programs meeting the certificate standards.  ASIS International is aware of the growing number of new security education and training programs in the US since 9/11—40 prior to 9/11 to over 400 today.  The curriculum set in the certificates provides a standard for security programs and courses.

    Dr. Sorcha MacLeod is lecturer at the University of Sheffield School of Law and an academic expert in the area of business and human rights with a particular focus on the private security industry.  She has published widely on these topics. She was a principal investigator and member of the Steering Committee for the EU-Funded PRIV-WAR project as well as a member of the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office’s Working Group on regulating private military and security contractors.  She participated in the Montreux Process and in the development of the ICoC and ICoCA. She is a human rights technical expert for the British Standards Institute (BSI) mirror group to “Management System for Quality of Private Security Company (PSC) Operations – Requirements with Guidance” and a member of the UK ISO/PC284 delegation. She is also currently a human rights subject matter expert on the UK PSC1 pilot audit certification scheme.

    Col. (ret.) Christopher Mayer is the Director, Contractor Standards and Compliance in the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense (Program Support). His primary responsibility is to develop policy and manage Department-level oversight for private security contractors (PSCs) supporting U.S. contingency operations. His duties include acting as U.S. Government Technical Representative in the development of industry standards for PSCs and U.S. Government technical advisor for the International Code of Conduct for Private Security Service Providers. More recently, this portfolio was expanded to include integration of human rights and anti-human trafficking policy into U.S. contingency contracting.

    Prior to his retirement from the U.S. Army in 2009, then-Colonel Mayer served under the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Global Security Affairs, where he was responsible for developing integrated approaches to post-conflict or disaster relief and recovery. He also represented the U.S. Government in drafting the Montreux Document for good practices regarding Private Military and Security Companies. Previous duty assignments include Senior U.S. Military Observer and Chief of Civil-Military Coordination to the UN Mission in Liberia (2007-2008); Chief of Staff for the Defense Reconstruction Support Office (2005-2007); and Chief of Staff, Iraq Program Management Office (2004-2005), responsible for the

    Provisional Authority-managed reconstruction of Iraq. In this capacity, he established an operations center to centrally manage Private Security Company support of reconstruction. A career armored cavalry officer, Christopher Mayer is also a qualified in Civil Affairs and certified in Defense acquisition and emergency management – including qualification as a search and rescue pilot.

    His awards include the Defense Superior Service Medal, the Legion of Merit, the Meritorious Service Medal, the Joint Service Commendation Medal, the Army Commendation Medal, the Superior Civilian Service Award, the Commander’s Award for Civilian Service, the Commander’s Award for Public Service, and the United Nations Medal. Chris Mayer holds Master’s Degrees from the University of Louisville and the Army War College and is a graduate of the U.S. Air Force Air War College.

    Peter McComish is Director Corporate Security for Barrick Gold Corporation. He is responsible for the strategic leadership, oversight and training programs for all aspects of security operations and product security for Barrick operations in Australia-Pacific, Africa and the Middle East.

    Prior to entering the corporate sector Peter worked in law-enforcement for 25 years. He led various general criminal and specialist investigative units, including intelligence operations and multinational gold thefts.  As the recipient of a 1995 Winston Churchill Fellowship he travelled extensively and operated in conjunction with law-enforcement in the United Kingdom (New Scotland Yard and Greater Manchester Police), Germany (BKA and  LKA Nordrhein-Westfalen), the United States (FBI, DEA and NYPD), and Canada (RCMP), specifically examining training systems and management of personnel involved in long-term complex organized crime operations.

    Since entering the corporate sector he has led security in Australia, the United States, Canada, Papua New Guinea, South Africa, Ghana, Tanzania, Peru, Argentina, the Dominican Republic, Chile, Zambia and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The reviews included security staff management and training programs, physical security systems, electronic security systems, gold product handling and accounting procedures and systems, the development of strategies to reduce gold and equipment theft, security of expatriate personnel, security of both explosives and chemicals, general security operations and mine closure risk management programs.  He has extensive experience implementing the Voluntary Principles on Security and Human Rights, including the training aspects for both public and private security providers.

    J.J. Messner is a Senior Associate at The Fund for Peace and the Director of FFP’s Sustainable Development & Security program. In this capacity he leads FFP’s work on training and implementation on the Voluntary Principles on Security & Human Rights and manages FFP’s long-standing Human Rights & Business Roundtable. He also co-directs FFP’s Failed States Index and oversees and coordinates the country data and trends analysis program as well as FFP’s media and communications outreach.

    J.J. leads many of FFP’s security & human rights implementation programs, including training programs and site-level assessments in partnership with various international oil and mining companies around the world. He has also designed and operationalized human rights training programs for military personnel in complex environments. Beyond the Washington, DC-based Human Rights & Business Roundtable, J.J. has facilitated multiple multistakeholder dialogues in numerous countries, on issues including human rights, conflict-free supply chains, and responsible investment. He has testified before Working Group and Committee hearings at the United Nations, African Union, and European Parliament. Since 2011, J.J. has been a Steering Committee Member and Board Member of the Voluntary Principles on Security & Human Rights.

    Prior to joining The Fund for Peace, from 2006 to 2010, J.J. was Director of the International Stability Operations Association (formerly the International Peace Operations Association), a non-profit organization focused on private sector support for operations in conflict and post-conflict environments. He was also the founder and Editor-in-Chief for four years of the Journal of International Peace Operations. J.J. also has experience in the fields of corporate antitrust law and educational non-profits.

    Originally from Adelaide, Australia, J.J. received his Bachelors degree in Politics and International Studies from the University of Adelaide, Australia and a Masters of Science (Peace Operations) from George Mason University in Arlington, Virginia. His academic work has also included research abroad in Costa Rica, India, Mexico and Timor-Leste as well as a study abroad at the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia.

    Andrew Nicholson, as Drum Cussac’s Director Government and Industry Affairs, has responsibility for all liaison with governments, both UK and abroad, and engagement with Industry bodies across all areas such as standards and accreditation and regulatory issues.

    Andrew is a former Royal Navy and Special Forces Officer with command and liaison experience in several operational environments including Sierra Leone, Northern Ireland, Iraq, Afghanistan and the Balkans. He has experience of working and liaising in multi-national and multi-stakeholder environments including with NATO deployments in post-conflict environments and working with CSOs and Governments in areas such as Afghanistan and Kosovo.  After leaving the navy, Andrew joined Drum Cussac as Director Maritime in August 2011. In this role he had responsibility for the delivery of all maritime security services for the company, including the recruitment and training of all contractors.  He assumed his current role in January 2013.

    Andrew takes an active and vital part in the development and maintenance of standards and ethics in the industry.  He is a member of the Board of Directors for the Association of the International Code of Conduct and is a member of the Executive Committee of the Security in Complex Environments Group (SCEG).  With his work with these organisations, Andrew has a particular focus in the application of human rights and professional standards in the private security industry and is often invited to consult and talk on these subjects at conferences and events.

    Col. Xavier Périllat-Piratoine is a colonel with the French Air force, recently assigned by France to the San Remo Institute for humanitarian law as the deputy director of the military department.

    Colonel Périllat-Piratoine graduated from Bordeaux faculty of law in 1984 and entered the Air Force in 1985. He occupied a number of positions and significantly in the last ten years that of senior legal adviser to the deputy chief of staff of the Air Force in charge of international relations, then legal adviser to the Togolese CHOD and to the military head of the Togolese Presidency cabinet. Finally he was for the last five years the senior legal adviser to the general commanding the Air defense and Air operations, the command that conducted the first strikes on Libya and Mali.

    Colonel Périllat-Piratoine has been deployed to Chad 1989, Bosnia, Sarajevo and Mostar in 1994 and 1996, Kabul 1n 2009 and 2013. He also recently graduated from the NATO Defense College.

    Richard Phillips is Chief Operating Officer (Strategy) for Constellis and Director of Edinburgh International. A graduate of St Andrews University, Richard was commissioned into the British Army in 1991, becoming a Captain and Pilot in the Army Air Corps. On leaving military service, Richard spent six years learning and providing Sales Management with two London commercial IT services companies.

    In 2004, Richard joined a fledgling Edinburgh International (EI). As a Director, with a growing portfolio, he led the Sales and Proposals Team, winning projects with a value of over $350m. He was also responsible for key development strategies, including sales & marketing, training & knowledge and IT. His role encompassed EI’s Governance, Risk and Compliance (GRC) function and Richard ran the EI GRC Enhancement Programme from 2010-12. This specifically analysed the compliance and training requirements of international humanitarian and human rights law, ICOC, PSC1 and other legal and voluntary requirements. This programme then designed and implemented the delivery systems, and real-time audit mechanism for these requirements. Richard has been actively involved in the ICOC drafting and establishment of the ICOCA.

    In 2012, Richard was appointed to lead the strategic development of Constellis Ltd, parent company of the Edinburgh International group.

    Dr. Aaron Ralby is director of Linguisticator, a company specializing in developing intensive and highly scalable language-training programs. Designed for maximum efficiency and effectiveness, these programs treat all aspects of the learning process systematically. Aaron holds a PhD in Medieval Studies from Cornell University and an MPhil in Anglo-Saxon, Norse, and Celtic from the University of Cambridge. He is currently in Tripoli, Libya, running a trial of ELT Tiger, an intensive English language training program designed for the Libyan military under the sponsorship of the UK Ministry of Defence.

    Dr. Ian Ralby is Executive Director of I.R. Consilium, a multinational and multidisciplinary company that provides advice and assistance to governments and organizations on matters of defense, security and international relations.  Dr. Ralby is an expert on the regulation, governance, and oversight of private security companies—both land and maritime—and has played a major role for nearly four years in various national and international efforts to develop codes, standards, and governance mechanisms for that industry.  He served as an independent consultant on the drafting of the International Code of Conduct (ICoC) and helped establish and, for over a year, run the Security in Complex Environments Group at A|D|S – the trade association chosen by the U.K. FCO to deliver government monitored regulation of the British private security industry. He participated heavily as a member of both the Technical Committee and Working Group for the drafting of both PSC.1, a Management System Standard, and PSC.2 a Conformity Assessment Standard for private security companies. He also co-chaired the Working Group of both PSC.3, a Maturity Model and PSC.4 a Maritime Security Implementation Guide for private security companies. Dr. Ralby also served on all three Working Groups for the development of the international governance and oversight mechanism and helped negotiate its Charter in February 2013. In addition to his work on private security matters, Dr. Ralby provides an array of international law and policy advice as well as both long-term and emergency assistance to sovereign governments and large corporations, occasionally imbedded as part of an internal advisory or negotiation team.  Dr. Ralby earned a B.A. in Modern Languages and Linguistics and an M.A. in Intercultural Communication at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County; a J.D. at the College of William and Mary where he was a Jack Kent Cooke Graduate Scholar; and an M.Phil. in International Relations and a Ph.D. in Politics and International Studies at St. John’s College of the University of Cambridge where he was a Gates Scholar.

    James Rapp is Managing Partner for 3rg Security, and a member of the Executive Committee of the UK’s Security in Complex Environments Group (SCEG). He is also the UK’s member on the ISO working group for ISO PAS 28007 for Private Maritime Security Companies. 3rg Security provides security and risk management services, and a range of training services, including counter-piracy training for team leaders and security operatives. He coordinated work within SCEG to achieve an accredited qualification for maritime security operatives (MSOs).  This is now in place with the highly respected vocational education organisation, City & Guilds.

    Dr. Jamie Shea is NATO Deputy Assistant Secretary General for Emerging Security Challenges. He has been working with NATO since 1980. Positions included Director of Policy Planning in the Private Office of the Secretary General, Deputy Assistant Secretary General for External Relations, Public Diplomacy Division, Director of Information and Press, Spokesman of NATO and Deputy Director of Information and Press, Deputy Head and Senior Planning Officer at the Policy Planning and Multilateral Affairs Section of the Political Directorate as well as Assistant to the Secretary General of NATO for Special Projects. Jamie Shea is involved with several prominent academic institutions and acts amongst others as professor of the Collège d’Europe, Bruges, Visiting Lecturer in the Practice of Diplomacy, University of Sussex, Associate Professor of International Relations at the American University, Washington DC, where he also holds the position of Director of the Brussels Overseas Study Programme, and lectures at the Brussels School of International Studies at the University of Kent. He also is a regular lecturer and conference speaker on NATO and European security affairs and on public diplomacy and political communication and lobbying. He holds a D.Phil. in Modern History from Oxford University (Lincoln College), 1981. Amongst his many associations and memberships, Jamie Shea is Member of the Advisory Board, Security and Defence Programmes at Chatham House, Member of the Policy Council at the World Economic Forum in Geneva and Founder and Member of the Board, Security and Defence Agenda Brussels.

    Jonathan Somer is an international law and policy consultant with expertise on armed non-state actors. He continues to consult for Geneva Call, where he has been Legal Advisor and Programme Coordinator since 2008. Previously, he worked with the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe in Bosnia-Herzegovina and Macedonia, and as an international law consultant with the Humanitarian Policy and Conflict Research Programme of Harvard University on the issue of private military and security companies, and the International Law Department of the Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs, on the Copenhagen Process for the Handling of Detainees in Multilateral Military Operations. In 2007, he was awarded the Henry Dunant Prize, in honour of the founder of the Red Cross movement, for innovative research on armed non-state actors. Jonathan has extensive experience in developing, leading and organizing trainings on international humanitarian and human rights law for non-state actors, as well as managing training pools. He sits on several experts groups related to armed non-state actors, and holds a B.A from the University of Western Ontario, a J.D. from the University of British Colombia, and an L.L.M from the Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights (formerly CUDIH).

    Major General (Ret.) Charles E. Tucker, Jr., JD, is the Executive Director and Co-Founder of the World Engagement Institute (“WEInstitute”). He previously served as the Executive Director of the International Human Rights Law Institute (IHRLI), Chicago, Illinois.  General Tucker’s mission is to develop and promote the fundamental rights of peoples around the world through education, research, documentation, capacity-building and advocacy. To accomplish this, he and the WEInstitute engage in contemporary human rights and rule of law research, training and advocacy, as well as in post-conflict justice capacity-building programs and large-scale human rights documentation projects throughout the world. General Tucker prepares international students, professionals and scholars for institutional capacity-building, rule of law and human rights careers by administering international institutional development projects, fellowship programs, special courses, internships and research opportunities in Chicago and abroad. Prior to founding the WEInstitute, General Tucker served as an international rule of law and humanitarian law practitioner, mostly with the U.S. Government.  He was routinely seconded to the U.S. State Department and various International Organizations. He served multiple tours of duty with the United Nations in various countries and served as Economic and Legal Adviser for the Office of the High Representative in Bosnia and Herzegovina. He also served as an International Law Adviser in the Office of the US Secretary of Defense. Additionally, he served as Legal Adviser for the U.S. Ambassador in Iraq, as well as for State Department and DOD missions in Europe, the Middle East, Central Asia, Central and South America. In his civilian capacity, he served as a Senior Field Attorney for the National Labor Relations Board, where he oversaw the NLRB General Counsel’s adjudication of complex labor rights cases. General Tucker is an accomplished lecturer and has authored numerous articles and manuals on international legal matters.  He has served as an Assistant Professor of Law at the U.S. Air Force Academy, as well as Course Director of the Academy’s Comparative International Law Program. He is the founding Co-Editor of the USAFA Journal of Legal Studies. And he served as Adjunct Professor of Management for Bradley University and as an Adjunct faculty member for Wayland College. He is a 1979 graduate of the University of Notre Dame (BA, Government), a 1982 graduate of the DePaul University College of Law (JD) and a 2003 graduate of the US Air War College. Prior to his retirement from the military in April 2009, Major General Tucker served on the joint staff of the National Guard Bureau. As the Director of Joint Doctrine, Training and Force Development, he was responsible for developing training and exercise policies and programs to ensure joint units of the National Guard were ready to respond to their homeland defense and homeland security missions. In addition, he formulated National Guard Joint Professional Military Education policy, coordinated periodic review of all Joint Professional Military Education curricula, and provided Joint Staff oversight to National Guard Homeland Defense and Joint Inter-agency Training Centers.

    Sylvia White has worked for Aegis for almost 6 years and has been involved in the industry drive for increased regulation throughout that time. She has extremely broad responsibilities across the Company and is a board member, as well as being responsible for all aspects of legal and regulatory compliance at Aegis, including commercial contractual matters (and the bidding function). She has been actively involved in the Security in Complex Environments Group in the UK, and the International Code of Conduct process, where she was a member of the temporary steering committee. Sylvia is a qualified lawyer with more than 15 years post qualification experience.

    Jamie A. Williamson has worked in the field of international law for over sixteen years, with the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), the United Nations, and in academia. Presently, he is the Legal Advisor for Common Law countries with the ICRC Advisory Services on International Humanitarian law in Geneva.  In this role, he assists State authorities with the implementation of IHL related treaties, with a particular focus on international justice, private security companies, the Environment, torture and terrorism.

    From 2008 to 2011, he served as the Legal Advisor at the ICRC Washington, D.C. Regional Delegation, where he was responsible for ICRC legal activities in the US and Canada, with a focus on Guantanamo and military operations in Afghanistan and Iraq. From 2005 to 2008, Jamie Williamson was the ICRC regional legal advisor based in Pretoria, South Africa.

    Before joining the ICRC, he worked for nearly ten years with the UN ad hoc international criminal tribunals in Tanzania and the Netherlands, and the Special Court for Sierra Leone. Jamie Williamson is a Faculty Member of the Academy of Human Rights at American University in Washington, D.C. He has published numerous papers on repression of war crimes, international justice, the regulation of private security companies, the laws of war, and challenges to international humanitarian law in contemporary armed conflicts.

  • INTRODUCTION TO THE WORKSHOP

    Recorded on Friday, November 1, 10:00-11:00pm ET

    This webinar will set out the need for a common understanding of training as it relates to Private Security Providers. This will include training necessary in the decision to use PSCs, the selection of PSCs, the operations of the PSCs themselves, and the proper oversight of their activities. Participants will be introduced to an overarching scenario that will provide the context for the seminar series. Use of the scenario will enable concepts to be presented and developed within a framework reflective of historic and emerging complex environments.

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    WHO NEEDS TO BE TRAINED

    Recorded Friday, November 8, 10:00-12:00pm ET

    Moving from a discussion of the need for training, this webinar will take on the challenge of identifying who needs to be trained. This will go beyond the employees and management of private security providers. Participants will be asked to identify all stakeholders who should be educated or trained in the operations of PSCs and the possible effects of such operations.

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    THE ELEMENTS OF TRAINING: WHAT NEEDS TO BE TAUGHT?

    Recorded Friday, November 15, 10:00-12:00pm ET

    Having identified who needs to be trained or educated in various aspects of PSC operations, this webinar will explore the specific subject areas that need to be addressed.  This is more than the technical skills that security providers must master. It includes the ways in which these skills can be used, the authorizations and limitations that those involved with PSCs must be aware of, and the second and third order effects of PSC activities on the long term goals of those who use or regulate these services. This will include a discussion of how the specific operational environment might affect the subject material and the target audience for each subject area.

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    PROVIDERS AND METHODS OF DELIVERY

    Recorded Friday, November 22, 10:00-12:00pm ET

    Building on previous seminar work identifying who needs to be trained or educated and the subject areas that need to be taught, this seminar will discuss possible sources for this training and how it might be delivered. Presentations will describe considerations of in-house and third party training providers and the role of the State and International Organizations. Using the webinar scenario, participants are expected to add their own insights about effective methods of delivery and to identify what elements can be taught on-site or in the affected region and which are more appropriately taught prior to deployment into a complex environment.

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    TRAINING QUALITY ASSURANCE

    Recorded Friday, November 29, 10:00-12:00pm ET

    There is a military saying that “The only things that get done are the things that get checked.” In the world of management, a similar adage states “What gets measured, gets managed.” This webinar will explore what tools are needed to do this checking and what persons and organizations might be available, competent, and trusted to perform these checks. Panelists will discuss auditor training and competency, surveillance and monitoring techniques, and the role of international organizations. Participants will be expected to apply their own experiences in self- and external monitoring and conformance assessment to the information presented within the context of the overarching scenario.

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    Recorded Friday, December 6, 2013

    This webinar summarizes the work to this point. Most importantly, it solicits input from all participants to identify the next steps necessary to implement the conclusions and recommendations of this series. The goal is to identify a commonly accepted, multi-faceted training approach that will promote the responsible provision of private security services, when such services are necessary and appropriate.

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